What is an Ethical Will? [And When Should You Write One?]

Ethical Wills: A Definition

Another term for an ethical will is a legacy letter. Unlike last wills and testaments, ethical wills are not legally binding. They don’t bequeath assets; they express a person’s deepest, most heartfelt thoughts and feelings about what’s important to them—what matters.

In the Judeo-Christian tradition, ethicals wills are a way of passings beliefs, values, blessings, and moral direction from one generation to the next. But they can be used by any person of any faith (or no faith at all)!

What Should My Ethical Will Look Like? 

Ethical wills can be as long as a book or as short as a couple paragraphs. They might look like letters, poems, songs, or have multimedia elements.

They include all of the following scenarios and more:

  • Parents who write a letter to their children every year on their birthdays, saying what the last year has meant to them and how the child has developed or grown.
  • A dying person who writes love letters to his/her spouse, children, or parents.
  • Elderly adults expressing their love to their children and grandchildren.
  • Individuals explaining the decisions they made in their legal will: the reasons why a person or organization received a given asset, or wishes for how their money will be spent.
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When should I write my ethical will?

A legacy letter can be written at any stage of life by anyone who wants to ensure that their values live on.

It can be read and shared among family members, or sealed until the writer dies.

It can also be updated at any time.

 

Want help writing your ethical will?